Cognitive Functionality May Be Related to Visual Impairment

Visual impairment among older adults associated with poor cognitive function

The number of individuals in the U.S. with vision problems is anticipated to double by 2050. Visual dysfunction and poor cognition are highly prevalent among ; however, the relationship is not well defined. Suzann Pershing, M.D., M.S., of the Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif., and colleagues conducted an analysis of two national data sets, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002, and the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), 2011-2015, to examine the association of measured and self-reported visual impairment (VI) with cognition in older US adults.

The NHANES included 2,975 respondents, ages 60 years and older, who completed a test measuring cognitive performance. The NHATS included 30, 202 respondents ages 65 years and older with dementia status assessment. The researchers found that VI was significantly associated with worse cognitive function after adjusting for demographics, health, and other factors. These findings were most pronounced for visual acuity measured at distance and by self-report.

Medical research and improvement is something very relevant to any aging adult. Since it is part of the aging process, being as educated as possible can help in improving different areas of life as we all get older. Cognitive function is relevant to senior living in Denver and can be improved upon as more research becomes available. 

Read the full article here: Visual impairment among older adults associated with poor cognitive function http://bit.ly/2weV8Q8

First Posted here: Cognitive Functionality May Be Related to Visual Impairment

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